http://cdn-parable.com/ProdImage/82/9780842343282.jpg

Death Strike

(Paperback - Feb 2000)
$5.99 - Online Price
Parable recommended!

Overview

These latest volumes of the hot-selling Left Behind juvenile series continue the story of four kids left behind after the Rapture. With themes and events that parallel the adult series, these books carry Left Behind's important message to the younger generation. In #8 "Death Strike, " Judd works hard all during his senior year at Nicolae High so he can give the speech of his life during his graduation ceremony. Will Judd be courageous enough to really present the gospel under the glare of the principal? The Young Trib Force must deal with Carpathia's strike against the militia and the beginning of World War 3.

Details

  • SKU: 9780842343282
  • SKU10: 0842343288
  • Title: Death Strike
  • Series: Left Behind: The Kids (Paperback)
  • Qty Remaining Online: 9
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Date Published: Feb 2000
  • Pages: 126
  • Age Range: 10 - 14
  • Grade Level: 5th Grade thru 9th Grade
  • Weight lbs: 0.17
  • Dimensions: 7.16" L x 4.40" W x 0.39" H
  • Features: Table of Contents, Price on Product, Ikids
  • Themes: Theometrics | Evangelical;
  • Category: FICTION, CHRISTIAN
  • Subject: Religious - Christian - Action & Adventure

Chapter Excerpt


Chapter One

Danger in the Cafeteria

Vicki Byrne saw the flash. A knife, she thought. Her friend Janie turned and screamed as a girl approached with the crude object.

"I'm sorry, Darla," Janie whined. "I'll get you the stuff today. Tomorrow at the latest."

"You won't be gettin' me anything," Darla snarled. "You're goin' down."

Janie scooted under the lunch table and out the other side. Now only Vicki separated Janie from harm. Danger in the Cafeteria

"I got no problem with you, Byrne. Outta the way."

Janie hunkered down behind Vicki. She knew the damage a homemade shank could do.

"I don't have a problem with you either, Darla," Vicki said. "Put that away. We can settle this without anybody getting hurt."

"I said I'd make her pay if she stiffed me again."

Vicki looked for a guard. Darla had waited for the right moment to bring out the knife.

"I didn't stiff you!"

"Shut up, Janie," Vicki said. She turned to Darla. "What if she gives your money back? Then everything's square, right?"

Janie tapped on Vicki's shoulder and whispered, "I don't have it."

"That's it," Darla yelled, pushing past Vicki and lunging toward Janie.

Vicki grabbed Darla's arm and pulled her down as a sharp pain invaded Vicki's side. Someone screamed. A whistle blew. Shouting. People crowded around, looking at her. A guard pushed people away.

"She's bleeding!" Janie yelled.

Vicki felt woozy. The room spun. Something warm ran from her side. The guard shouted, "Leave the knife in! You'll do more damage if you take it out!"

* * *

Judd passed the security gauntlet at Nicolae High. There were more Global Community guards this year. Mrs. Jenness, the principal, kept watch at the front.

Judd had vowed to become valedictorian of his class. Speeches he had heard during the most tumultuous year in history left him hollow. If he had the chance, he would use the opportunity to give a speech his classmates and their parents would never forget.

Judd had never had to work for good grades. But his newfound faith had encouraged him to study the Bible like never before, and the discipline helped in other areas. Before the disappearances, several students had been ahead of him academically. Many of them had vanished. The rest he could pass with straight A's. He set his mind toward the goal.

But Judd had problems. His father's money was quickly running out. The monthly bills, the trip to Israel, and the expense of the Underground had drained the account. If he didn't come up with an answer soon, he would be forced to sell the house.

Throughout the summer, Judd and the others had written Vicki. When she wrote back, she seemed hopeful, but Judd could read between the lines. Northside Detention Center was an awful place. Pastor Bruce Barnes told Judd and the others to keep praying. He was working on a plan.

Between his many trips overseas, Bruce had put the Young Tribulation Force through a rigorous discipleship program. Ryan called it Bible Boot Camp. Judd couldn't believe how much they were growing and learning. And it was fun. Each new insight and memorized verse made him feel stronger. He had once seen the Bible as difficult to understand. Now each passage was a challenge, a truth waiting to be uncovered.

When Bruce was away, Chloe Steele took them through their daily paces of study and memorization. Her friendship had meant a lot to Lionel and Ryan as well. Nothing could stop the pain of losing Vicki. They had no idea when or if she would ever return.

"Thompson, in my office," Mrs. Jenness said. "Now!"

The last time the two had been face-to-face, Judd was in a police station under suspicion for involvement with the Underground.

As soon as Judd was seated, Principal Jenness said, "Your friend, Coach Handlesman, is continuing his reeducation with the Global Community. He probably won't be back. At least not here."

"What does that have to do with me, ma'am?" Judd said.

"If the coach really was behind the underground newspaper as he claimed, that little problem should disappear."

"And what does that have to do with me?" Judd said without blinking.

"Maybe nothing," she said, studying him. "Just listen carefully during the assembly. The new directives from the Global Community apply doubly to you."

* * *

Vicki awoke to searing pain and cried out.

"Lie still and I'll get you something," the nurse said.

Blood stained the sheets. A bandage stretched across her wound. Vicki was afraid to look at it.

"You're lucky," the nurse said. "Didn't hit any vitals. But we had to stitch you up and give you a shot for infection. That was a pretty rusty shank."

The nurse left as Mrs. Weems came in the room. She was a large woman whose presence was felt anywhere she went.

"Care to tell me your side?" Mrs. Weems said.

"I'm fine, thank you," Vicki said.

Mrs. Weems snarled, "You're a strange kid, Byrne. You're different."

"Thank you," Vicki said.

"I hate different. To survive here you have to learn to get along."

"That's what I was doing," Vicki said. She explained what had happened.

"That was Janie's last chance," Mrs. Weems said.

"She didn't do anything."

"She was selling drugs," Mrs. Weems said. "She'll be shipped downstate to an adult facility."

Vicki had heard the hard juvenile cases were being treated as adults, but she didn't want to believe it.

"And me?"

"Come to my office as soon as you can move. I have some papers that need to be signed."

"Papers?" Vicki said.

"When you can walk, you're out of here."

"I'm going downstate too?" Vicki said, but Mrs. Weems was already out the door.

* * *

The fieldhouse was full. Incoming freshmen were required to sit in the front. Most hung on Mrs. Jenness's every word. Several times Lionel turned around and looked at Judd. Lionel rolled his eyes each time. Mrs. Jenness welcomed students and introduced key faculty members. To her right were Global Community guards in uniform.

"Looks like they're stepping up security," John whispered.

"Why do they need eight guards?" Mark said.

"It is our hope," Mrs. Jenness said, "that when you look back at Nicolae Carpathia High School twenty years from now, you will think of a time of unprecedented peace and learning."

In six years, I won't be thinking about this place at all, Judd thought.

"Last year a faculty member caused great anxiety on this campus," Mrs. Jenness said. "He is no longer with us. We are grateful that the Global Community peacekeeping forces have been given the power to enforce the new rules."

Mark caught Judd's eye. "Sounds like trouble," he said.

"Belief is a private matter. Individuals must come to their own conclusions. Our new policies include zero tolerance for those who push their beliefs on others. Any student, faculty member, or other employee doing this will suffer quick and severe punishment."

Judd saw several freshmen look at each other. They had to wonder what Mrs. Jenness was talking about.

"Students will be expelled, their records destroyed. Hopes for higher education will be lost. Those involved in any divisive activity like last year may be sent to a Global Community reeducation facility."

John leaned over and whispered, "Are these just threats?"

"See all the extra cameras in the hallway?" Judd said.

A freshman raised a hand. Mrs. Jenness shook her head. "We'll save time for questions. Now I want you to see another move toward school unity."

Two students, a boy and a girl, walked on stage and stood by the podium. The boy wore black pants and a gray shirt. The girl wore a black skirt and a gray top. On the left shoulder of both shirts was a dove, the new mascot of the school.

"I liked it better when we were the Prospect Knights," John said. "It's hard to root for a football team called the Doves."

Judd stifled a laugh.

"Beginning tomorrow," Mrs. Jenness continued, "you may purchase these uniforms in the school bookstore. Those who object to our symbol of peace may opt to wear this." She held up the same style of shirt, but in place of the dove was a huge red X.

* * *

Vicki winced with each step, but she had to know what Mrs. Weems was talking about. Blood oozed from her wound as she made it to the office.

"You should have listened to me," Mrs. Weems said. "You shouldn't have run away from the foster family."

"I didn't," Vicki said. "When I became friends with their disowned daughter, I knew they wouldn't let me stay."

Mrs. Weems leveled her eyes at Vicki. "Everyone in here is as innocent as Anne of Green Gables. Learn from this, Byrne. Don't get sent back here a third time."

Mrs. Weems shoved a stack of papers toward her. "Sign."

"What are these?"

"Adoption papers."

"What?"

"It's your choice. If you'd rather stay here-"

"No," Vicki said. "I'll sign, but-"

"You want to know where you're going?"

"Exactly."

"You'll find out tomorrow."

(Continues.)

Excerpt

Vicki Byrne saw the flash. A knife, she thought. Her friend Janie turned and screamed as a girl approached with the crude object.

“I’m sorry, Darla,” Janie whined. “I’ll get you the stuff today. Tomorrow at the latest.”

“You won’t be gettin’ me anything,” Darla snarled. “You’re goin’ down.”

Janie scooted under the lunch table and out the other side. Now only Vicki separated Janie from harm.

“I got no problem with you, Byrne. Outta the way.”

Janie hunkered down behind Vicki. She knew the damage a homemade shank could do.

“I don’t have a problem with you either, Darla,” Vicki said. “Put that away. We can settle this without anybody getting hurt.”

“I said I’d make her pay if she stiffed me again.”

Vicki looked for a guard. Darla had waited for the right moment to bring out the knife.

“I didn’t stiff you!”

“Shut up, Janie,” Vicki said. She turned to Darla. “What if she gives your money back? Then everything’s square, right?”

Janie tapped on Vicki’s shoulder and whispered, “I don’t have it.”

“That’s it,” Darla yelled, pushing past Vicki and lunging toward Janie.

Vicki grabbed Darla’s arm and pulled her down as a sharp pain invaded Vicki’s side. Someone screamed. A whistle blew. Shouting. People crowded around, looking at her. A guard pushed people away.

“She’s bleeding!” Janie yelled.

Vicki felt woozy. The room spun. Something warm ran from her side. The guard shouted, “Leave the knife in! You’ll do more damage if you take it out!”

Judd passed the security gauntlet at Nicolae High. There were more Global Community guards this year. Mrs. Jenness, the principal, kept watch at the front.

Judd had vowed to become valedictorian of his class. Speeches he had heard during the most tumultuous year in history left him hollow. If he had the chance, he would use the opportunity to give a speech his classmates and their parents would never forget.

Judd had never had to work for good grades. But his newfound faith had encouraged him to study the Bible like never before, and the discipline helped in other areas. Before the disappearances, several students had been ahead of him academically. Many of them had vanished. The rest he could pass with straight A’s. He set his mind toward the goal.

But Judd had problems. His father’s money was quickly running out. The monthly bills, the trip to Israel, and the expense of the Underground had drained the account. If he didn’t come up with an answer soon, he would be forced to sell the house.

Throughout the summer, Judd and the others had written Vicki. When she wrote back, she seemed hopeful, but Judd could read between the lines. Northside Detention Center was an awful place. Pastor Bruce Barnes told Judd and the others to keep praying. He was working on a plan.

Between his many trips overseas, Bruce had put the Young Tribulation Force through a rigorous discipleship program. Ryan called it Bible Boot Camp. Judd couldn’t believe how much they were growing and learning. And it was fun. Each new insight and memorized verse made him feel stronger. He had once seen the Bible as difficult to understand. Now each passage was a challenge, a truth waiting to be uncovered.

When Bruce was away, Chloe Steele took them through their daily paces of study and memorization. Her friendship had meant a lot to Lionel and Ryan as well. Nothing could stop the pain of losing Vicki. They had no idea when or if she would ever return.

“Thompson, in my office,” Mrs. Jenness said. “Now!”

The last time the two had been face-to-

face, Judd was in a police station under suspicion for involvement with the Underground.

As soon as Judd was seated, Principal Jenness said, “Your friend, Coach Handles-

man, is continuing his reeducation with the Global Community. He probably won’t be back. At least not here.”

“What does that have to do with me, ma’am?” Judd said.

“If the coach really was behind the underground newspaper as he claimed, that little problem should disappear.”

“And what does that have to do with me?” Judd said without blinking.

“Maybe nothing,” she said, studying him. “Just listen carefully during the assembly. The new directives from the Global Community apply doubly to you.”

Vicki awoke to searing pain and cried out.

“Lie still and I’ll get you something,” the nurse said.

Blood stained the sheets. A bandage stretched across her wound. Vicki was afraid to look at it.

“You’re lucky,” the nurse said. “Didn’t hit any vitals. But we had to stitch you up and give you a shot for infection. That was a pretty rusty shank.”

The nurse left as Mrs. Weems came in the room. She was a large woman whose presence was felt anywhere she went.

“Care to tell me your side?” Mrs. Weems said.

“I’m fine, thank you,” Vicki said.

Mrs. Weems snarled, “You’re a strange kid, Byrne. You’re different.”

“Thank you,” Vicki said.

“I hate different. To survive here you have to learn to get along.”

“That’s what I was doing,” Vicki said. She explained what had happened.

“That was Janie’s last chance,” Mrs. Weems said.

“She didn’t do anything.”

“She was selling drugs,” Mrs. Weems said. “She’ll be shipped downstate to an adult facility.”

Vicki had heard the hard juvenile cases were being treated as adults, but she didn’t want to believe it.

“And me?”

“Come to my office as soon as you can move. I have some papers that need to be signed.”

“Papers?” Vicki said.

“When you can walk, you’re out of here.”

“I’m going downstate too?” Vicki said, but Mrs. Weems was already out the door.

The fieldhouse was full. Incoming freshmen were required to sit in the front. Most hung on Mrs. Jenness’s every word. Several times Lionel turned around and looked at Judd. Lionel rolled his eyes each time. Mrs. Jenness welcomed students and introduced key faculty members. To her right were Global Community guards in uniform.

“Looks like they’re stepping up security,” John whispered.

“Why do they need eight guards?” Mark said.

“It is our hope,” Mrs. Jenness said, “that when you look back at Nicolae Carpathia High School twenty years from now, you will think of a time of unprecedented peace and learning.”

In six years, I won’t be thinking about this place at all, Judd thought.

“Last year a faculty member caused great anxiety on this campus,” Mrs. Jenness said. “He is no longer with us. We are grateful that the Global Community peacekeeping forces have been given the power to enforce the new rules.”

Mark caught Judd’s eye. “Sounds like trouble,” he said.

“Belief is a private matter. Individuals must come to their own conclusions. Our new policies include zero tolerance for those who push their beliefs on others. Any student, faculty member, or other employee doing this will suffer quick and severe punishment.”

Judd saw several freshmen look at each other. They had to wonder what Mrs. Jenness was talking about.

“Students will be expelled, their records destroyed. Hopes for higher education will be lost. Those involved in any divisive activity like last year may be sent to a Global Community reeducation facility.”

John leaned over and whispered, “Are these just threats?”

“See all the extra cameras in the hallway?” Judd said.

A freshman raised a hand. Mrs. Jenness shook her head. “We’ll save time for questions. Now I want you to see another move toward school unity.”

Two students, a boy and a girl, walked on stage and stood by the podium. The boy wore black pants and a gray shirt. The girl wore a black skirt and a gray top. On the left shoulder of both shirts was a dove, the new mascot of the school.

“I liked it better when we were the Prospect Knights,” John said. “It’s hard to root for a football team called the Doves.”

Judd stifled a laugh.

“Beginning tomorrow,” Mrs. Jenness continued, “you may purchase these uniforms in the school bookstore. Those who object to our symbol of peace may opt to wear this.” She held up the same style of shirt, but in place of the dove was a huge red X.

Vicki winced with each step, but she had to know what Mrs. Weems was talking about. Blood oozed from her wound as she made it to the office.

“You should have listened to me,” Mrs. Weems said. “You shouldn’t have run away from the foster family.”

“I didn’t,” Vicki said. “When I became friends with their disowned daughter, I knew they wouldn’t let me stay.”

Mrs. Weems leveled her eyes at Vicki. “Everyone in here is as innocent as Anne of Green Gables. Learn from this, Byrne. Don’t get sent back here a third time.”

Mrs. Weems shoved a stack of papers toward her. “Sign.”

“What are these?”

“Adoption papers.”

“What?”

“It’s your choice. If you’d rather stay here—”

“No,” Vicki said. “I’ll sign, but—”

“You want to know where you’re going?”

“Exactly.”

“You’ll find out tomorrow.”



Copyright © 2001
Used by permission. Unauthorized duplication prohibited.

Jerry B. Jenkins

Jerry B. Jenkins describes himself as the “most famous writer no one’s ever heard of.” With the success of his Left Behind series, he has become the leading contemporary evangelical novelist. He is the author of six New York Times best-selling books, including three Left Behind titles -- Left Behind, Apollyon and Assassins.

A writer with a wide range of interests, Jenkins has had great success writing biographies for sports heroes and Christian leaders. His other New York Times best-sellers include Out of the Blue with Orel Hershiser and Miracle Man with Nolan Ryan. He also assisted Billy Graham with his best-selling memoir, Just As I Am. Jenkins specializes in three genres: biographies, marriage and family topics, and fiction for both children and adults.

A former vice president for publishing for the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Jenkins served for many years as editor of Moody Magazine and is now Moody’s writer-at-large. His work has appeared in publications as varied as Reader’s Digest, Parade, in-flight magazines, and many Christian periodicals.

His most successful novels have been his apocalyptic titles from Tyndale House Publishers: Left Behind, Tribulation Force, Nicolae, Soul Harvest, Apollyon and Assassins –- co-authored with Tim LaHaye. More than 18 million copies have been sold in the product line thus far. The highly anticipated seventh book in the series, The Indwelling, hits bookstores on Tuesday, May 23, 2000, with a record two million books in the first printing.

Jenkins is the novelist for the series, while co-author LaHaye, a former pastor, provides the outline of prophecy based on biblical text. The duo’s teamwork has resulted in a series that has broken all precedents for Christian fiction. As the Dallas Morning News writes, “It’s not your mama’s Christian fiction anymore.”

Two of Jenkins’ novels are being developed into Hollywood productions: ‘Twas the Night Before as a CBS television movie for Christmas 2000, and Left Behind as a feature film.

Jenkins and his wife Dianna live in Colorado and have three sons—one married, another in college, and one in high school.

Tim LaHaye

Dr. Tim LaHaye is a noted author, minister, counselor, television commentator and nationally recognized speaker on family life and Bible prophecy. Co-author of the Left Behind series, it was LaHaye’s idea to fictionalize an account of the Rapture and the Tribulation.

LaHaye is the founder and president of Tim LaHaye Ministries and the founder of the PreTrib Research Center. Currently, LaHaye speaks at many of the major Bible prophecy conferences in the United States and Canada.

For 25 years, LaHaye pastored one of the nation’s outstanding churches in San Diego, California, which grew to three locations. During this time, he also founded two accredited Christian high schools, a school system of 10 Christian schools, and Christian Heritage College, and assisted Dr. Henry Morris in the founding of the Institute for Creation Research, the nation’s foremost exponent of creationist materials.

LaHaye has written 47 books on a wide range of subjects, such as family life, temperaments, and Bible prophecy. One of his best-sellers from Tyndale House Publishers is The Spirit-Controlled Temperament. His current novels, co-authored with Jerry B. Jenkins, is the all-time best-selling Christian fiction series. With six titles in the series, Left Behind, Tribulation Force, Nicolae, Soul Harvest, Apollyon and Assassins, the books have reached as high as number two on The New York Times best-seller list. Sales have exceeded eighteen million copies. The highly anticipated seventh book, The Indwelling, releases May 23, 2000.

LaHaye came up with the idea of a novel about the Second Coming. “Sitting on airplanes and watching the pilots,” he told People Magazine, “I’d think to myself, ‘What if the Rapture occurred on an airplane?’” LaHaye looked for a co-writer for several years and was then introduced to writer Jerry B. Jenkins through their mutual literary agent, Rick Christian, president of the Colorado Springs agency, Alive Communications, who also negotiated the book deal.

LaHaye holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Western Conservative Theological Seminary and has been awarded the Doctor of Literature degree from Liberty University.

LaHaye and his wife Beverly, who is founder and chairman of the board of Concerned Women for America, have been married for 52 years. They have four grown children and nine grandchildren.

The Kids Series

BOOK ONE: The Vanishings

In one shocking moment millions around the globe disappear. Those left behind face an uncertain future—especially four kids who now find themselves alone. As the kids search for help and for answers, they are told the truth behind the disappearances. But are they ready to believe it?

BOOK TWO: Second Chance

Faced with the truth behind the disappearances, Judd, Vicki, Lionel, and Ryan have decisions to make. Will they accept Christ’s forgiveness, or will they blame God for abandoning them and taking away their families?

BOOK THREE: Through the Flames

To prove his worth to the others, Ryan sneaks around associates of Lionel’s Uncle Andre to find out what he can about Andre’s fate. What he learns puts his friends in grave danger. Judd and Lionel narrowly escape with their lives in a harrowing rescue attempt in an apartment fire set by a murderer.

BOOK FOUR: Facing the Future

Bruce Barnes has been teaching Judd, Vicki, Lionel, and Ryan about the coming events during the Tribulation. They are sure Christ will return for them, but one question remains: Who is the Antichrist? Bruce thinks he knows. The kids aren’t so sure. Until a man who has met the Antichrist shares his nightmarish story.

BOOK FIVE: Nicolae High

A new challenge faces Judd, Vicki, Ryan, and Lionel. They must take their newfound faith to the classrooms of Global Community Middle School and Nicolae Carpathia High. Danger awaits them. Should they obey the authorities, who outlaw carrying Bibles or even talking about God? Should they risk everything and speak the truth to their friends? Who can they trust?

BOOK SIX: The Underground

The Young Trib Force unleashes the power of the printed page through an underground newspaper at Nicolae High. School authorities are enraged after only a few copies of the first edition are distributed. After Judd devises a plan to distribute a copy of it to every student in the school, the authorities search with a vengeance for the kids responsible.

BOOK SEVEN: Busted

Pursued by authorities from Nicolae High, Vicki and Judd attempt escape. A friend’s betrayal puts Vicki on trial. With Old Testament prophecies coming true before their eyes, the Young Trib Force struggles to spread the truth no matter what the cost. But the noose is tightening. Will the group stick together? Who is the insider at the school helping them?

BOOK EIGHT: Death Strike

A horrifying future awaits the Young Trib Force. As Vicki fights for her life in a detention center, Judd sets a new goal that could put the group in the greatest danger yet. With conflict arising, Judd faces a decision that will affect the rest of his life. The rise of a rebel group, a global catastrophe, a disappearance, and the death of a friend give the kids a heartbreaking challenge.

Reviews

Similar Products

Also in "Left Behind: The Kids (Paperback)" Series

Triumphant Return [Paperback] (Sep 2004) $5.99
Ominous Choices: The Race for Life [Paperback] (May 2004) $5.99
Escape to Masada: Joining Operation Eagle [Paperback] (Sep 2003) $5.99
War of the Dragon: Miracles in the Air [Paperback] (Sep 2003) $5.99
Breakout [Paperback] (Jun 2003) $5.99
Murder in the Holy Place [Paperback] (Jun 2003) $5.99
Wildfire! [Paperback] (Apr 2003) $5.99
The Mark of the Beast [Paperback] (Apr 2003) $5.99
Death at the Gala [Paperback] (Mar 2003) $5.99
The Beast Arises: Unveiling the Plan [Paperback] (Mar 2003) $5.99
Horsemen of Terror: The Unseen Judgment [Paperback] (Oct 2002) $5.99
Attack of Apollyon: Revenge of the Locusts [Paperback] (Feb 2002) $5.99
A Dangerous Plan: Race Against Time [Paperback] (Feb 2002) $5.99
Terror in the Stadium: Witnesses Under Fire [Paperback] (Sep 2001) $5.99
Darkening Skies: Judgment of Ice [Paperback] (Sep 2001) $5.99
Battling the Commander [Paperback] (May 2001) $5.99
Fire from Heaven [Paperback] (May 2001) $5.99
The Showdown [Paperback] (Jan 2001) $5.99
Judgment Day [Paperback] (Jan 2001) $5.99
Into the Storm [Paperback] (Oct 2000) $5.99
Earthquake! [Paperback] (Oct 2000) $5.99
The Search [Paperback] (Jun 2000) $5.99

Look for similar products by Subject

>> Books >> Kids >> Fiction
>> Kids >> Books >> Fiction