http://cdn-parable.com/ProdImage/05/9781480554405.jpg

If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat

(CD)
$17.59 - Online Price
$19.99 - Retail Price
You save: $2.40 (12 %)

Overview

You?re one step away from the adventure of your life Deep within you lies the same faith and longing that sent Peter walking across the wind-swept Sea of Galilee toward Jesus. In what ways is the Lord telling you, as he did Peter, ?Come John Ortberg invites you to consider the incredible potential that awaits you outside your comfort zone. Out on the risky waters of faith, Jesus is waiting to meet you in ways that will change you forever, deepening your character and your trust in God. The experience is terrifying. It's thrilling beyond belief. It's everything you?d expect of someone worthy to be called Lord. The choice is yours to know him as only a water-walker can, aligning yourself with God's purpose for your life in the process. There's just one requirement: If you want to walk on water, you?ve got to get out of the boat "John Ortberg is profound without being heavy." ? Dallas Willard, author, The Divine Conspiracy

Details

  • SKU: 9781480554405
  • SKU10: 1480554405
  • Title: If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat
  • Qty Remaining Online: 3
  • Publisher: Zondervan on Brilliance Audio
  • Date Published: Aug 2013
  • Playing Time: 480
  • Units Per Item: 7
  • Weight lbs: 0.30
  • Dimensions: 5.50" L x 5.00" W x 0.80" H
  • Category: CHRISTIAN LIVING
  • Subject: Christian Life - General
NOTE: Related content on this page may not be applicable to all formats of this product.

Chapter Excerpt

 

Chapter One

What's Water-Walking? SESSION ONEBefore You LeadSynopsisThis six-session series focuses on events that took place during a stormy night on the Sea of Galilee. The biblical account of these events includes the disciples' struggling all night to sail through a fierce storm, Jesus' walking through the stormy darkness to meet his disciples, and Peter's accepting Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and walk on the water with him. Today, just as it was for Jesus' disciples, it is often easier to trust in things, people, or circumstances rather than God. We try to create security in such comfortable "boats" as money, success, relationships, and secret addictions. Our boats can appear to be safe, secure, and comfortable compared with the seemingly risky chaos outside them. Yet apart from God, even our best-built boats cannot protect us. In this session, you'll guide participants in realizing that they, like Peter and the other disciples, face an important choice: to accept Jesus' invitation to step into the adventure and risk of life outside the boat or to cling to the safety of the boat and try to avoid fear and risk. As unlikely as it may seem, real security comes when we step out of the boat and learn that God can be trusted fully. Stepping out of the boat is the only way to real growth. It's the only way true faith develops. It's part of discovering and obeying our calling. And it's where we find Jesus. Jesus used that eventful night to teach his disciples that he could be trusted-and that they needed to get out of the boat and walk with him! Today, just as he did that stormy night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus is still looking for people who will get out of the boat and walk with him. If we do, we will face storms. We will have to take risks. We may even fail. But we can trust Jesus to be there to reach out and help us.Key Points of This Session1. God has given us a tremendous invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. When we step out of the "boat"-the comfort and security we cherish-we experience the unforgettable thrill of doing something with God that we could never accomplish on our own. 2. It's always risky to step out of the boat. It is always scary to leave the security of the boat and face the churning waters of the storm. The risk of failure can loom bigger than life. But facing fear is the price we must pay for growth, and failure has less to do with what happens to us than it does how we judge what has happened. 3. Jesus is looking for those who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat and walk with him.Suggested ReadingChapter 1 of If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the BoatMaterialsA television set, VCR player, video, pens and pencils, BiblesSESSION OUTLINE 52 MINUTES I. Introduction (5 minutes) Welcome What's to Come Questions to Think About II. Video Presentation: "What's Water-Walking?" (14 minutes) III. Group Discovery (27 minutes) Video Highlights (4 minutes) Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) Small Group Exploration (9 minutes) Group Discussion (5 minutes) IV. Personal Journey (5 minutes) V. Closing Meditation (1 minute) What's Water-Walking SESSION ONEThere is something-Someone-inside us who tells us there is more to life than sitting in the boat. You were made for something more There is something inside you that wants to walk on the water-to leave the comfort of routine existence and abandon yourself to the high adventure of following God. -John OrtbergINTRODUCTION 5 MINUTES WelcomeParticipant's Guide page 9. Welcome participants to If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat session 1, "What's Water-Walking?"What's to ComeOne night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus' disciples struggled for hours to sail their boat through a fierce storm. Suddenly Jesus came into view, walking toward them through the stormy darkness. During our time together today, we'll explore what happened when Peter boldly accepted Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and join him on the water. We'll consider what it means for us to accept Jesus' invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. We'll look at the risk and the promise of being a water-walker. Let's begin by considering a few questions related to water-walking. These questions are on page 10.Questions to Think AboutParticipant's Guide page 10. As time permits, ask two or more of the following questions and solicit responses from group members. 1. What kinds of things do you trust in, especially when life gets stormy, that help you feel comfortable and secure rather than fearful? Be honest!Suggested Response: Responses will vary but may include such things as money, career path, investments, supportive relationships. This question begins to introduce participants to the high price we pay-and the risks we take-when we trust in things or people rather than in God.2. Explain why you do or do not believe that God calls everyone who follows him to step out in faith and do something extra-ordinary. What does "stepping out in faith" look like?Suggested Response: Responses will vary, of course. But in preparation for the next questions, it is important that participants begin to define "stepping out in faith," knowing why it is important, describing what it looks like, and identifying what may be at risk.3. How would you define failure?Suggested Response: Responses will vary. Part of this session deals with our perceptions regarding failure, so it will be helpful for participants to begin thinking about their personal definitions and perceptions of failure.4. Thus far in life, what has been your experience with failure? What has failure kept you from doing? What has failure done for you?Suggested Response: Experiences of failure may vary greatly. Some participants may have very negative perceptions of failure and may even be paralyzed by past failure. Other participants may view failure as an opportunity, a stepping-stone to something greater. What's important is that participants express and listen to different perceptions and begin to connect with the risks of water-walking.Let's keep these ideas in mind as we view the video. There is space to take notes on page 11.VIDEO PRESENTATION: "WHAT'S WATER-WALKING?" 14 MINUTESParticipant's Guide page 11.Video ObservationsImages of a balloon ride Following Jesus: choosing between comfort and growth Did Peter fail-or succeed? Discovering the power of JesusGROUP DISCOVERY 27 MINUTES If your group has seven or more members, use the Video Highlights with the entire group (4 minutes), then complete the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and break into small groups of three to five people for the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). At the end, bring everyone together for the closing Group Discussion (5 minutes).If your group has fewer than seven members, begin with the Video Highlights (4 minutes), then complete both the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). Wrap up your discovery time with the Group Discussion (5 minutes). Please turn to page 12.Video Highlights • 4 minutesParticipant's Guide page 12. As time permits, ask one or more of the following questions, which directly relate to the video the participants have just seen. 1. When John Ortberg and his wife took their hot-air balloon ride, the competence of their pilot became very important to them. Why is it so important for us to know the competence and trustworthiness of whoever pilots our lives?Suggested Response: Whenever we allow someone else to take control, we take a risk. If the pilot is experienced and trust-worthy, we can relax and trust him to care for us. But if the pilot is inexperienced or is not trustworthy, our welfare is at risk. When we step out of the boat, we're counting on Jesus to come through for us. We are counting on his character and strength to lead us and rescue us if we fall.2. Jesus invited Peter to step out of the boat and walk with him-to do something Peter could not do on his own-and Peter couldn't resist the opportunity. Jesus is still looking for people who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat. What do you find intriguing about stepping out of the boat?Suggested Response: The specifics will vary, but people who love Jesus enough and trust him enough to leave what is safe and comfortable are drawn by a powerful calling. Ask participants to share how they feel about following God's calling.3. What are your thoughts on John Ortberg's comments about failure, particularly that failure has more to do with the way we view the outcome of an event than what actually happened?Suggested Response: Participants may agree or disagree. The point is that we can view our attempts as failures or as stepping-stones that lead toward success and increased faith. So much depends on our perspective.Please turn to page 13 and we will take a closer look at what happened to Jesus' disciples during that dark, stormy night.Large Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 13.An Adventure in the DarkLet's take a closer look at what happened when Jesus revealed himself to his disciples as they sailed across the stormy Sea of Galilee, because that event matters a great deal to us today. We too have the opportunity to walk with Jesus in places we wouldn't dream of going on our own. Like each of the disciples, we must choose how we will respond to God. Will we sit in the boat, like the eleven disciples? Or will we, like Peter, leave the security of the boat and give God the opportunity to use us in extraordinary ways?1. When Jesus told the disciples to sail to the other side of the Sea of Galilee without him, they obeyed. But what happened as they sailed? (See Matthew 14:22-26; Mark 6:45-50.)Suggested Response: A terrible storm with gale-force winds came up. While they strained at the oars against the wind, they saw Jesus walking toward them on the water. Thinking he was a ghost, they were so terrified that they cried out.2. What did Jesus say to them, and why is this significant today? (See Matthew 14:27.)Suggested Response: Jesus told them to have courage, told them who he was, and then told them not to be afraid. The "take courage, do not fear, I am with you" theme recurs throughout Scripture, especially when those who obey God face difficulties. It is no less true or important today than during biblical times.3. From Peter's perspective, recap what happened after Jesus told the disciples who he was. What is significant about Peter's response to Jesus? (See Matthew 14:28-32.)Suggested Response: Peter didn't risk everything and jump into the water right away. First, he acted wisely by wanting to know whether Jesus thought getting out of the boat was a good idea. When Jesus told Peter to come to him, Peter got out and started walking toward Jesus. Then he saw the wind, became scared, and began to sink. So he called out to Jesus, who caught Peter by the hand and then asked him why he doubted. When Jesus and Peter climbed into the boat, the wind immediately died down. As impulsive as we know Peter was, it's interesting to note that he kept directing his attention toward Jesus to learn what to do.4. What impact did this event have on the disciples? (See Matthew 14:33; Mark 6:51.)Suggested Response: They saw Jesus in a way they had never seen him before. They were amazed. They recognized him for who he truly was-the Son of God-and responded in worship.5. What impact do you think this event had on Peter?Suggested Response: Peter abandoned himself completely to Jesus, something the other disciples did not do. He risked everything and experienced firsthand the glory of walking on the water. Because of his faithful steps, he succeeded in doing, in God's power, what he could never have done on his own. No doubt he remembered that miracle and the lessons learned for the rest of his life.Let's break into small groups of three to five people for our Small Group Exploration, which begins on page 17. I will give you a one-minute warning before we rejoin for our Group Discussion.Small Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 17. Please note there are two topics to explore in this session. Assign one topic to half of the small groups, the other topic to the other half. You may want to have a representative from each group share their discoveries at the beginning of the Group Discussion that follows. Topic AWhere Do We Place Our Trust When We Are Afraid?God knows how fearful we are, and he sometimes uses uncomfortable, real-world challenges to cause us to choose where we will place our trust. John Ortberg explains it this way: "The decision to grow [spiritually] always involves a choice between risk and comfort. This means that to be a follower of Jesus you must renounce comfort as the ultimate value of your life." Let's explore what God says about fear and choosing where we place our trust. 1. What happens when we place our trust in "boats" of our own making instead of placing our trust in God? (See Psalm 49:1-13.)Suggested Response: We all will die one day. We can't take the money we've made with us, nor can it buy eternal life. Trusting in ourselves and our perishable riches or relationships isn't the answer. God alone gives eternal life.2. What did David realize about finding security in God rather than in things? (See Psalm 20:6-7; 118:6-9.)Suggested Response: David realized that God was all the protection he needed and that it was far better to trust in God's saving power than in people, chariots, and horses (symbols of security and power in those days). 3. What do the following verses reveal about God? a. Psalm 18:1-5Suggested Response: God is our strength, our protector, and our deliver. We can find refuge in him. b. Psalm 56:5-4Suggested Response: We can trust in God when we are afraid. c.


Continues.

Continues.
 

Chapter One

What's Water-Walking? SESSION ONEBefore You LeadSynopsisThis six-session series focuses on events that took place during a stormy night on the Sea of Galilee. The biblical account of these events includes the disciples' struggling all night to sail through a fierce storm, Jesus' walking through the stormy darkness to meet his disciples, and Peter's accepting Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and walk on the water with him. Today, just as it was for Jesus' disciples, it is often easier to trust in things, people, or circumstances rather than God. We try to create security in such comfortable "boats" as money, success, relationships, and secret addictions. Our boats can appear to be safe, secure, and comfortable compared with the seemingly risky chaos outside them. Yet apart from God, even our best-built boats cannot protect us. In this session, you'll guide participants in realizing that they, like Peter and the other disciples, face an important choice: to accept Jesus' invitation to step into the adventure and risk of life outside the boat or to cling to the safety of the boat and try to avoid fear and risk. As unlikely as it may seem, real security comes when we step out of the boat and learn that God can be trusted fully. Stepping out of the boat is the only way to real growth. It's the only way true faith develops. It's part of discovering and obeying our calling. And it's where we find Jesus. Jesus used that eventful night to teach his disciples that he could be trusted-and that they needed to get out of the boat and walk with him! Today, just as he did that stormy night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus is still looking for people who will get out of the boat and walk with him. If we do, we will face storms. We will have to take risks. We may even fail. But we can trust Jesus to be there to reach out and help us.Key Points of This Session1. God has given us a tremendous invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. When we step out of the "boat"-the comfort and security we cherish-we experience the unforgettable thrill of doing something with God that we could never accomplish on our own. 2. It's always risky to step out of the boat. It is always scary to leave the security of the boat and face the churning waters of the storm. The risk of failure can loom bigger than life. But facing fear is the price we must pay for growth, and failure has less to do with what happens to us than it does how we judge what has happened. 3. Jesus is looking for those who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat and walk with him.Suggested ReadingChapter 1 of If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the BoatMaterialsA television set, VCR player, video, pens and pencils, BiblesSESSION OUTLINE 52 MINUTES I. Introduction (5 minutes) Welcome What's to Come Questions to Think About II. Video Presentation: "What's Water-Walking?" (14 minutes) III. Group Discovery (27 minutes) Video Highlights (4 minutes) Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) Small Group Exploration (9 minutes) Group Discussion (5 minutes) IV. Personal Journey (5 minutes) V. Closing Meditation (1 minute) What's Water-Walking SESSION ONEThere is something-Someone-inside us who tells us there is more to life than sitting in the boat. You were made for something more There is something inside you that wants to walk on the water-to leave the comfort of routine existence and abandon yourself to the high adventure of following God. -John OrtbergINTRODUCTION 5 MINUTES WelcomeParticipant's Guide page 9. Welcome participants to If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat session 1, "What's Water-Walking?"What's to ComeOne night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus' disciples struggled for hours to sail their boat through a fierce storm. Suddenly Jesus came into view, walking toward them through the stormy darkness. During our time together today, we'll explore what happened when Peter boldly accepted Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and join him on the water. We'll consider what it means for us to accept Jesus' invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. We'll look at the risk and the promise of being a water-walker. Let's begin by considering a few questions related to water-walking. These questions are on page 10.Questions to Think AboutParticipant's Guide page 10. As time permits, ask two or more of the following questions and solicit responses from group members. 1. What kinds of things do you trust in, especially when life gets stormy, that help you feel comfortable and secure rather than fearful? Be honest!Suggested Response: Responses will vary but may include such things as money, career path, investments, supportive relationships. This question begins to introduce participants to the high price we pay-and the risks we take-when we trust in things or people rather than in God.2. Explain why you do or do not believe that God calls everyone who follows him to step out in faith and do something extra-ordinary. What does "stepping out in faith" look like?Suggested Response: Responses will vary, of course. But in preparation for the next questions, it is important that participants begin to define "stepping out in faith," knowing why it is important, describing what it looks like, and identifying what may be at risk.3. How would you define failure?Suggested Response: Responses will vary. Part of this session deals with our perceptions regarding failure, so it will be helpful for participants to begin thinking about their personal definitions and perceptions of failure.4. Thus far in life, what has been your experience with failure? What has failure kept you from doing? What has failure done for you?Suggested Response: Experiences of failure may vary greatly. Some participants may have very negative perceptions of failure and may even be paralyzed by past failure. Other participants may view failure as an opportunity, a stepping-stone to something greater. What's important is that participants express and listen to different perceptions and begin to connect with the risks of water-walking.Let's keep these ideas in mind as we view the video. There is space to take notes on page 11.VIDEO PRESENTATION: "WHAT'S WATER-WALKING?" 14 MINUTESParticipant's Guide page 11.Video ObservationsImages of a balloon ride Following Jesus: choosing between comfort and growth Did Peter fail-or succeed? Discovering the power of JesusGROUP DISCOVERY 27 MINUTES If your group has seven or more members, use the Video Highlights with the entire group (4 minutes), then complete the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and break into small groups of three to five people for the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). At the end, bring everyone together for the closing Group Discussion (5 minutes).If your group has fewer than seven members, begin with the Video Highlights (4 minutes), then complete both the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). Wrap up your discovery time with the Group Discussion (5 minutes). Please turn to page 12.Video Highlights • 4 minutesParticipant's Guide page 12. As time permits, ask one or more of the following questions, which directly relate to the video the participants have just seen. 1. When John Ortberg and his wife took their hot-air balloon ride, the competence of their pilot became very important to them. Why is it so important for us to know the competence and trustworthiness of whoever pilots our lives?Suggested Response: Whenever we allow someone else to take control, we take a risk. If the pilot is experienced and trust-worthy, we can relax and trust him to care for us. But if the pilot is inexperienced or is not trustworthy, our welfare is at risk. When we step out of the boat, we're counting on Jesus to come through for us. We are counting on his character and strength to lead us and rescue us if we fall.2. Jesus invited Peter to step out of the boat and walk with him-to do something Peter could not do on his own-and Peter couldn't resist the opportunity. Jesus is still looking for people who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat. What do you find intriguing about stepping out of the boat?Suggested Response: The specifics will vary, but people who love Jesus enough and trust him enough to leave what is safe and comfortable are drawn by a powerful calling. Ask participants to share how they feel about following God's calling.3. What are your thoughts on John Ortberg's comments about failure, particularly that failure has more to do with the way we view the outcome of an event than what actually happened?Suggested Response: Participants may agree or disagree. The point is that we can view our attempts as failures or as stepping-stones that lead toward success and increased faith. So much depends on our perspective.Please turn to page 13 and we will take a closer look at what happened to Jesus' disciples during that dark, stormy night.Large Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 13.An Adventure in the DarkLet's take a closer look at what happened when Jesus revealed himself to his disciples as they sailed across the stormy Sea of Galilee, because that event matters a great deal to us today. We too have the opportunity to walk with Jesus in places we wouldn't dream of going on our own. Like each of the disciples, we must choose how we will respond to God. Will we sit in the boat, like the eleven disciples? Or will we, like Peter, leave the security of the boat and give God the opportunity to use us in extraordinary ways?1. When Jesus told the disciples to sail to the other side of the Sea of Galilee without him, they obeyed. But what happened as they sailed? (See Matthew 14:22-26; Mark 6:45-50.)Suggested Response: A terrible storm with gale-force winds came up. While they strained at the oars against the wind, they saw Jesus walking toward them on the water. Thinking he was a ghost, they were so terrified that they cried out.2. What did Jesus say to them, and why is this significant today? (See Matthew 14:27.)Suggested Response: Jesus told them to have courage, told them who he was, and then told them not to be afraid. The "take courage, do not fear, I am with you" theme recurs throughout Scripture, especially when those who obey God face difficulties. It is no less true or important today than during biblical times.3. From Peter's perspective, recap what happened after Jesus told the disciples who he was. What is significant about Peter's response to Jesus? (See Matthew 14:28-32.)Suggested Response: Peter didn't risk everything and jump into the water right away. First, he acted wisely by wanting to know whether Jesus thought getting out of the boat was a good idea. When Jesus told Peter to come to him, Peter got out and started walking toward Jesus. Then he saw the wind, became scared, and began to sink. So he called out to Jesus, who caught Peter by the hand and then asked him why he doubted. When Jesus and Peter climbed into the boat, the wind immediately died down. As impulsive as we know Peter was, it's interesting to note that he kept directing his attention toward Jesus to learn what to do.4. What impact did this event have on the disciples? (See Matthew 14:33; Mark 6:51.)Suggested Response: They saw Jesus in a way they had never seen him before. They were amazed. They recognized him for who he truly was-the Son of God-and responded in worship.5. What impact do you think this event had on Peter?Suggested Response: Peter abandoned himself completely to Jesus, something the other disciples did not do. He risked everything and experienced firsthand the glory of walking on the water. Because of his faithful steps, he succeeded in doing, in God's power, what he could never have done on his own. No doubt he remembered that miracle and the lessons learned for the rest of his life.Let's break into small groups of three to five people for our Small Group Exploration, which begins on page 17. I will give you a one-minute warning before we rejoin for our Group Discussion.Small Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 17. Please note there are two topics to explore in this session. Assign one topic to half of the small groups, the other topic to the other half. You may want to have a representative from each group share their discoveries at the beginning of the Group Discussion that follows. Topic AWhere Do We Place Our Trust When We Are Afraid?God knows how fearful we are, and he sometimes uses uncomfortable, real-world challenges to cause us to choose where we will place our trust. John Ortberg explains it this way: "The decision to grow [spiritually] always involves a choice between risk and comfort. This means that to be a follower of Jesus you must renounce comfort as the ultimate value of your life." Let's explore what God says about fear and choosing where we place our trust. 1. What happens when we place our trust in "boats" of our own making instead of placing our trust in God? (See Psalm 49:1-13.)Suggested Response: We all will die one day. We can't take the money we've made with us, nor can it buy eternal life. Trusting in ourselves and our perishable riches or relationships isn't the answer. God alone gives eternal life.2. What did David realize about finding security in God rather than in things? (See Psalm 20:6-7; 118:6-9.)Suggested Response: David realized that God was all the protection he needed and that it was far better to trust in God's saving power than in people, chariots, and horses (symbols of security and power in those days). 3. What do the following verses reveal about God? a. Psalm 18:1-5Suggested Response: God is our strength, our protector, and our deliver. We can find refuge in him. b. Psalm 56:5-4Suggested Response: We can trust in God when we are afraid. c.


Continues.

Continues.

Chapter One

Acerca de caminar sobre el agua

No es el crítico el que cuenta; no es el hombre que señala cómo el fuerte se derrumba o donde el que hace algo pudo haberlo hecho mejor. El crédito le pertenece al hombre que está en la arena . quien, a lo sumo, conoce al fin el triunfo de un gran logro y, en el peor caso, si fracasa, al menos se atreve osadamente. De modo que su lugar nunca será con aquellas tímidas y frías almas que no conocen ni la victoria ni la derrota.

Theodore Roosevelt

Hace algún tiempo, mi esposa me dio como regalo de cumpleaños un paseo en globo aerostático. Fuimos al aeródromo y nos metimos a una pequeña canastilla junto con otra pareja. Nos presentamos e intercambiamos información sobre nuestras carreras. Entonces el piloto comenzó el ascenso. Apenas había amanecido; era un día claro, fresco y sin nubes. Podíamos ver completo el Valle Canejo, desde los escarpados cañones hasta el Océano Pacífico. Era pintoresco, inspirador y majestuoso.

Pero también experimenté una emoción que no había anticipado. ¿Sabes cuál?

El temor.

Siempre pensé que esas canastillas llegaban más arriba del pecho, pero esta solo alcanzaba nuestras rodillas. Un buen tambaleo habría sido suficiente para echar a alguien por la borda. Así que me agarré con inflexible determinación hasta que los nudillos se me emblanquecieron.

Miré a mi esposa, a quien las alturas realmente la despreocupan, y me relajé un poco, sabiendo que había en la canastilla alguien más tenso que yo. Lo sabía porque no se movía para nada, para nada en lo absoluto. En algún momento de nuestro vuelo pasamos sobre un rancho de crianza de caballos y, sin siquiera voltear o inclinar su cabeza, movió solamente los ojos hacia un lado tanto como pudo y me dijo: «Sí, es hermoso».

Ya para este momento decidí que me gustaría conocer al jovencito que estaba piloteando el globo. Me di cuenta de que podía tratar de autoconvencerme de que todo saldría bien, pero la verdad era que habíamos confiado nuestras vidas y destinos en las manos del piloto. Todo dependía de su carácter y capacidad.

Le pregunté cómo se ganaba la vida y cómo comenzó a pilotear globos aerostáticos. Esperaba que su ocupación anterior estuviera llena de responsabilidades: neurocirujano, quizás o un astronauta que ya no pudo ir al espacio.

Supe que estábamos en problemas cuando comenzó a responderme: «Viejo, es muy fácil .»

¡Ni siquiera tenía empleo! Lo que más hacía era surfear.

Dijo que comenzó a pilotear globos aerostáticos porque un día, luego de tomar varias copas de más, comenzó a pasear en su camioneta, la chocó y como resultado su hermano quedó gravemente herido. Este no se había podido recuperar del todo, así que mirar globos aerostáticos volar lo entretenía un poco.

«Por cierto –añadió-, si llega a caer en picada cuando bajemos, no se sorprendan. Nunca he volado este globo en particular y no estoy muy seguro de cómo va a resultar el descenso».

Mi esposa me miró y me dijo: «¿Quieres decir que estamos a trescientos cincuenta metros sobre el suelo con un surfista desempleado que comenzó a pilotear globos porque tomó varias copas de más, chocó una camioneta, lastimó a su hermano, nunca ha estado en este globo y no sabe cómo bajarlo?»

En ese momento la mujer de la otra pareja me miró y pronunció las únicas palabras que alguno de ellos iba a decir en todo el vuelo.

«Usted es pastor. Haga algo religioso».

Así que recogí una ofrenda.

La gran pregunta en un momento así es: ¿Puedo confiar en el piloto?

Podría convencerme a mí mismo de que todo resultaría bien. Enfrentar el vuelo con una actitud positiva ciertamente haría el viaje más placentero. Pero este terminaría pronto. La preocupación real era el «tipo» que estaba piloteando el globo. ¿Eran su carácter y capacidad suficientes para dejar confiadamente mi destino en sus manos?

¿O era el momento de hacer algo cristiano?

Todos los días tú y yo recorremos otro tramo de nuestro viaje en este globo gigante que gira en torno a un vasto universo. Solo tenemos una oportunidad de hacerlo. Anhelo enfrentarlo con un gran espíritu de aventura y riesgo. Y apuesto que tú también.

Pero a veces es un paseo muy incierto. Me gustaría que los bordes de mi canasta estuvieran un poco más altos. Que el globo fuera más resistente. Me pregunto cómo terminará mi viajecito. No estoy seguro de la amanera en que voy a maniobrar en mi descenso.

Puedo tratar de convencerme a mí mismo para arriesgarme y creer que todo saldrá bien. Pero la verdadera pregunta es: ¿Hay alguien piloteando esta cosa? ¿Son su carácter y capacidad dignos de confianza? Porque, si no, no quiero arriesgarme. Mi historia, como la de todo ser humano es, al menos en parte, una lucha entre la fe y el temor.

Debido a esto, he sentido atracción durante muchos años por la historia de Pedro cuando sale de la barca y camina sobre el agua con Jesús. Es uno de los mejores retratos del mayor significado del discipulado en la Escritura. En los siguientes capítulos miraremos de cerca cada detalle del relato para encontrar lo que nos enseña acerca de caminar sobre el agua. Pero por el resto de este capítulo, hagamos una toma aérea. ¿De qué está hecho alguien que camina sobre el agua?

Los que caminan sobre el agua reconocen la presencia de Dios

Pedro y sus compañeros se metieron a un pequeño bote una tarde para cruzar el mar de Galilea. Jesús quería estar solo, así que se fueron a navegar sin él. A Pedro no le incomodó eso: había estado en barcas toda la vida. Es más, le gustaban.

(Continues.)

 

Chapter One

What's Water-Walking? Session OneThere is something-Someone-inside us who tells us there is more to life than sitting in the boat. You were made for something more There is something inside you that wants to walk on the water-to leave the comfort of routine existence and abandon yourself to the high adventure of following God. -John Ortberg Questions to Think About1. What kinds of things do you trust in, especially when life gets stormy, that help you feel comfortable and secure rather than fearful? Be honest!2. Explain why you do or do not believe that God calls everyone who follows him to step out in faith and do something extraordinary. What does "stepping out in faith" look like?3. How would you define failure?4. Thus far in life, what has been your experience with failure? What has failure kept you from doing? What has failure done for you? Video ObservationsImages of a balloon ride Following Jesus: choosing between comfort and growth Did Peter fail-or succeed?Discovering the power of Jesus Video Highlights1. When John Ortberg and his wife took their hot-air balloon ride, the competence of their pilot became very important to them. Why is it so important for us to know the competence and trustworthiness of whoever pilots our lives?2. Jesus invited Peter to step out of the boat and walk with him-to do something Peter could not do on his own-and Peter couldn't resist the opportunity. Jesus is still looking for people who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat. What do you find intriguing about stepping out of the boat?3. What are your thoughts on John Ortberg's comments about failure, particularly that failure has more to do with the way we view the outcome of an event than what actually happened? Large Group ExplorationAn Adventure in the DarkLet's take a closer look at what happened when Jesus revealed himself to his disciples as they sailed across the stormy Sea of Galilee, because that event matters a great deal to us today. We too have the opportunity to walk with Jesus in places we wouldn't dream of going on our own. Like each of the disciples, we must choose how we will respond to God. Will we sit in the boat, like the eleven disciples? Or will we, like Peter, leave the security of the boat and give God the opportunity to use us in extraordinary ways?1. When Jesus told the disciples to sail to the other side of the Sea of Galilee without him, they obeyed. But what happened as they sailed? (See Matthew 14:22-26; Mark 6:45-50.) 2. What did Jesus say to them, and why is this significant today? (See Matthew 14:27.) 3. From Peter's perspective, recap what happened after Jesus told the disciples who he was. What is significant about Peter's response to Jesus? (See Matthew 14:28-32.) 4. What impact did this event have on the disciples? (See Matthew 14:33; Mark 6:51.) 5. What impact do you think this event had on Peter? Who Deserves the Credit?It's not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena . who, at best, knows in the end the triumph of great achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly. So that his place will never be with those cold timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. -Theodore Roosevelt Highlights from the History of Water-Walking For a very long time God has been in the business of inviting people to be water-walkers. Here are a few examples to consider: Person Water-Walking The Result Invitation Abraham Sacrifice his son Isaac. God honored Abraham's (See Genesis 22.) faith and provided a ram for the sacrifice. Moses Lead the Israelites out of God parted the Red Sea, Egypt, which meant allowing the Israelites to crossing the Red Sea cross on dry land, then with the Egyptian army drowned the Egyptian in hot pursuit. (See army. Exodus 3:7-10 and chapter 14.) Joshua Lead the Israelites across As soon as the priests' the flooded Jordan River feet touched the water with the ark of the of the Jordan River, it covenant carried by the stopped flowing and the priests at the front of the people crossed on dry people. (See Joshua 3.) land. Joshua Instead of going into God made the wall of battle, the Israelites were Jericho fall down so that to march around the the Israelites could overtake walled city of Jericho the city-the first with the ark of the key barrier to entering covenant for six days, the Promised Land. then march around the city seven times on the seventh day and blow horns and shout when the trumpet sounded. (See Joshua 6.) Twelve spies Believe that despite the Ten of them refused to frightening obstacles in believe God and his Canaan, God would be promises and perished faithful to give the in the wilderness. Israelites the Promised Land and all of its goodness. (See Numbers 13-14.) Rich young ruler Give up his material He refused and went possessions and follow away saddened. We do Jesus. (See Matthew not know what took 19:16-22.) place in his life. Small Group ExplorationTopic AWhere Do We Place Our Trust When We Are Afraid?God knows how fearful we are, and he sometimes uses uncomfortable, real-world challenges to cause us to choose where we will place our trust. John Ortberg explains it this way: "The decision to grow [spiritually] always involves a choice between risk and comfort. This means that to be a follower of Jesus you must renounce comfort as the ultimate value of your life." Let's explore what God says about fear and choosing where we place our trust. 1. What happens when we place our trust in "boats" of our own making instead of placing our trust in God? (See Psalm 49:1-13.) 2. What did David realize about finding security in God rather than in things? (See Psalm 20:6-7; 118:6-9.) 3. What do the following verses reveal about God? a. Psalm 18:1-3 b. Psalm 56:3-4 c. Jeremiah 17:7-8 4. What has God said to his people over and over again, and why do you think he repeated it? (See Genesis 15:1; 21:17; Joshua 8:1; Daniel 10:12.)Topic BWhat Happened When These People Got Out of Their Boats?The Bible records the stories of many people who had to choose whether to trust God and step out in faith. Let's explore what happened to two men who, like Peter, decided to trust God and leave behind the security, comfort, and safety they had tried to provide for themselves.Moses1. What happened when Moses-the adopted son of the Pharaoh's daughter-took matters into his own hands when he saw an Israelite being mistreated by an Egyptian? (See Exodus 2:10-15; 3:1.) 2. How did God appear to Moses, and what did he want Moses to do? (See Exodus 3:1-4, 9-10.) 3. How did Moses respond when God presented the invitation to step out of the boat? (See Exodus 3:11-13; 4:13.) 4. Finally Moses took the plunge and returned to Egypt to urge Pharaoh to let the Israelites go. What happened as a result of God's power and the shepherd's water-walking obedience? (See Exodus 12:31-37.)Gideon5. Where was Gideon trying to find comfort and safety when God approached him? (See Judges 6:11.) 6. Gideon was afraid to take the challenge the angel of the Lord presented to him. How did God respond to his fears? (See Judges 6:12-18; 7:9-15.) 7. How did God use this "insignificant" farmer who finally decided to obey and trust him? (See Judges 7:16-24.) The Pluses of Water-Walking It is the only way to real growth. It is the way true faith develops. It is the alternative to boredom and stagnation. It is part of discovering and obeying our calling. The water is where Jesus is! Group Discussion1. Fear of failure is one reason many of us don't step out of the boat. Some people view Peter's walk on the water as a failure, but John Ortberg points out that there were eleven bigger failures sitting in the boat. In what ways does our perception of failure affect our willingness to start water-walking? Think about It Failure is not an event, but rather a judgment about an event. Failure is not something that happens to us or a label we attach to things. It is a way we think about outcomes. -John Ortberg 2. How much does our view of God's character and competence influence the degree to which we are willing to trust him and, in faith, to accept his calling and take risks?3. Would you agree that sometimes the "boats" we create-whatever gives us an illusion of control, whatever or whomever (besides God) we are tempted to put our trust in when life is stormy-might actually be more dangerous than water-walking with Jesus? Why or why not?4. If we keep choosing not to step out of our boats, what happens to us? To people around us? To our relationship with God? Personal Journey: To Do Now1. In If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat, John Ortberg writes, "I believe that there is some aspect of your life in which God is calling you to walk with and to him, and that when we say yes to his calling, it sets in motion a divine dynamic far beyond merely human power." In what ways might God be calling you to get out of your "boat" and step out in faith?2. Usually anyone who begins water-walking has to face personal fear. What deep fears keep you from really walking with and obeying God, from stepping out in faith and with his help doing what you could never do on your own? List fears that are specific to the calling you wrote down for question 1. 3. Looking back on your life so far, when have you said no to God's call? When have you said yes? Why? What happened as a result of those choices?4. Which small or large steps can you begin taking this week to get out of your boat a little each day? Personal Journey: To Do on Your OwnYou've learned a few basics about water-walking and have been encouraged to think about your choices, your boats, and the opportunity to water-walk. It's easy to seek comfort and create boats, isn't it? That's why so many people choose that path. But God is calling you, as he calls every believer, to put your faith in him and start getting out of your boat a little more each day. Set aside some quiet time to think about the following questions. There are no right or wrong answers, and nobody needs to know your responses, unless you choose to discuss them with someone. What's important is that you take time to reflect on some issues that you explored today, issues that may cause you to become uncomfortable or even a bit angry-at yourself, God, or someone else.


Continues.
 

Chapter One

What's Water-Walking? SESSION ONEBefore You LeadSynopsisThis six-session series focuses on events that took place during a stormy night on the Sea of Galilee. The biblical account of these events includes the disciples' struggling all night to sail through a fierce storm, Jesus' walking through the stormy darkness to meet his disciples, and Peter's accepting Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and walk on the water with him. Today, just as it was for Jesus' disciples, it is often easier to trust in things, people, or circumstances rather than God. We try to create security in such comfortable "boats" as money, success, relationships, and secret addictions. Our boats can appear to be safe, secure, and comfortable compared with the seemingly risky chaos outside them. Yet apart from God, even our best-built boats cannot protect us. In this session, you'll guide participants in realizing that they, like Peter and the other disciples, face an important choice: to accept Jesus' invitation to step into the adventure and risk of life outside the boat or to cling to the safety of the boat and try to avoid fear and risk. As unlikely as it may seem, real security comes when we step out of the boat and learn that God can be trusted fully. Stepping out of the boat is the only way to real growth. It's the only way true faith develops. It's part of discovering and obeying our calling. And it's where we find Jesus. Jesus used that eventful night to teach his disciples that he could be trusted-and that they needed to get out of the boat and walk with him! Today, just as he did that stormy night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus is still looking for people who will get out of the boat and walk with him. If we do, we will face storms. We will have to take risks. We may even fail. But we can trust Jesus to be there to reach out and help us.Key Points of This Session1. God has given us a tremendous invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. When we step out of the "boat"-the comfort and security we cherish-we experience the unforgettable thrill of doing something with God that we could never accomplish on our own. 2. It's always risky to step out of the boat. It is always scary to leave the security of the boat and face the churning waters of the storm. The risk of failure can loom bigger than life. But facing fear is the price we must pay for growth, and failure has less to do with what happens to us than it does how we judge what has happened. 3. Jesus is looking for those who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat and walk with him.Suggested ReadingChapter 1 of If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the BoatMaterialsA television set, VCR player, video, pens and pencils, BiblesSESSION OUTLINE 52 MINUTES I. Introduction (5 minutes) Welcome What's to Come Questions to Think About II. Video Presentation: "What's Water-Walking?" (14 minutes) III. Group Discovery (27 minutes) Video Highlights (4 minutes) Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) Small Group Exploration (9 minutes) Group Discussion (5 minutes) IV. Personal Journey (5 minutes) V. Closing Meditation (1 minute) What's Water-Walking SESSION ONEThere is something-Someone-inside us who tells us there is more to life than sitting in the boat. You were made for something more There is something inside you that wants to walk on the water-to leave the comfort of routine existence and abandon yourself to the high adventure of following God. -John OrtbergINTRODUCTION 5 MINUTES WelcomeParticipant's Guide page 9. Welcome participants to If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat session 1, "What's Water-Walking?"What's to ComeOne night on the Sea of Galilee, Jesus' disciples struggled for hours to sail their boat through a fierce storm. Suddenly Jesus came into view, walking toward them through the stormy darkness. During our time together today, we'll explore what happened when Peter boldly accepted Jesus' invitation to step out of the boat and join him on the water. We'll consider what it means for us to accept Jesus' invitation to step out in faith and walk with him. We'll look at the risk and the promise of being a water-walker. Let's begin by considering a few questions related to water-walking. These questions are on page 10.Questions to Think AboutParticipant's Guide page 10. As time permits, ask two or more of the following questions and solicit responses from group members. 1. What kinds of things do you trust in, especially when life gets stormy, that help you feel comfortable and secure rather than fearful? Be honest!Suggested Response: Responses will vary but may include such things as money, career path, investments, supportive relationships. This question begins to introduce participants to the high price we pay-and the risks we take-when we trust in things or people rather than in God.2. Explain why you do or do not believe that God calls everyone who follows him to step out in faith and do something extra-ordinary. What does "stepping out in faith" look like?Suggested Response: Responses will vary, of course. But in preparation for the next questions, it is important that participants begin to define "stepping out in faith," knowing why it is important, describing what it looks like, and identifying what may be at risk.3. How would you define failure?Suggested Response: Responses will vary. Part of this session deals with our perceptions regarding failure, so it will be helpful for participants to begin thinking about their personal definitions and perceptions of failure.4. Thus far in life, what has been your experience with failure? What has failure kept you from doing? What has failure done for you?Suggested Response: Experiences of failure may vary greatly. Some participants may have very negative perceptions of failure and may even be paralyzed by past failure. Other participants may view failure as an opportunity, a stepping-stone to something greater. What's important is that participants express and listen to different perceptions and begin to connect with the risks of water-walking.Let's keep these ideas in mind as we view the video. There is space to take notes on page 11.VIDEO PRESENTATION: "WHAT'S WATER-WALKING?" 14 MINUTESParticipant's Guide page 11.Video ObservationsImages of a balloon ride Following Jesus: choosing between comfort and growth Did Peter fail-or succeed? Discovering the power of JesusGROUP DISCOVERY 27 MINUTES If your group has seven or more members, use the Video Highlights with the entire group (4 minutes), then complete the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and break into small groups of three to five people for the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). At the end, bring everyone together for the closing Group Discussion (5 minutes).If your group has fewer than seven members, begin with the Video Highlights (4 minutes), then complete both the Large Group Exploration (9 minutes) and the Small Group Exploration (9 minutes). Wrap up your discovery time with the Group Discussion (5 minutes). Please turn to page 12.Video Highlights • 4 minutesParticipant's Guide page 12. As time permits, ask one or more of the following questions, which directly relate to the video the participants have just seen. 1. When John Ortberg and his wife took their hot-air balloon ride, the competence of their pilot became very important to them. Why is it so important for us to know the competence and trustworthiness of whoever pilots our lives?Suggested Response: Whenever we allow someone else to take control, we take a risk. If the pilot is experienced and trust-worthy, we can relax and trust him to care for us. But if the pilot is inexperienced or is not trustworthy, our welfare is at risk. When we step out of the boat, we're counting on Jesus to come through for us. We are counting on his character and strength to lead us and rescue us if we fall.2. Jesus invited Peter to step out of the boat and walk with him-to do something Peter could not do on his own-and Peter couldn't resist the opportunity. Jesus is still looking for people who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat. What do you find intriguing about stepping out of the boat?Suggested Response: The specifics will vary, but people who love Jesus enough and trust him enough to leave what is safe and comfortable are drawn by a powerful calling. Ask participants to share how they feel about following God's calling.3. What are your thoughts on John Ortberg's comments about failure, particularly that failure has more to do with the way we view the outcome of an event than what actually happened?Suggested Response: Participants may agree or disagree. The point is that we can view our attempts as failures or as stepping-stones that lead toward success and increased faith. So much depends on our perspective.Please turn to page 13 and we will take a closer look at what happened to Jesus' disciples during that dark, stormy night.Large Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 13.An Adventure in the DarkLet's take a closer look at what happened when Jesus revealed himself to his disciples as they sailed across the stormy Sea of Galilee, because that event matters a great deal to us today. We too have the opportunity to walk with Jesus in places we wouldn't dream of going on our own. Like each of the disciples, we must choose how we will respond to God. Will we sit in the boat, like the eleven disciples? Or will we, like Peter, leave the security of the boat and give God the opportunity to use us in extraordinary ways?1. When Jesus told the disciples to sail to the other side of the Sea of Galilee without him, they obeyed. But what happened as they sailed? (See Matthew 14:22-26; Mark 6:45-50.)Suggested Response: A terrible storm with gale-force winds came up. While they strained at the oars against the wind, they saw Jesus walking toward them on the water. Thinking he was a ghost, they were so terrified that they cried out.2. What did Jesus say to them, and why is this significant today? (See Matthew 14:27.)Suggested Response: Jesus told them to have courage, told them who he was, and then told them not to be afraid. The "take courage, do not fear, I am with you" theme recurs throughout Scripture, especially when those who obey God face difficulties. It is no less true or important today than during biblical times.3. From Peter's perspective, recap what happened after Jesus told the disciples who he was. What is significant about Peter's response to Jesus? (See Matthew 14:28-32.)Suggested Response: Peter didn't risk everything and jump into the water right away. First, he acted wisely by wanting to know whether Jesus thought getting out of the boat was a good idea. When Jesus told Peter to come to him, Peter got out and started walking toward Jesus. Then he saw the wind, became scared, and began to sink. So he called out to Jesus, who caught Peter by the hand and then asked him why he doubted. When Jesus and Peter climbed into the boat, the wind immediately died down. As impulsive as we know Peter was, it's interesting to note that he kept directing his attention toward Jesus to learn what to do.4. What impact did this event have on the disciples? (See Matthew 14:33; Mark 6:51.)Suggested Response: They saw Jesus in a way they had never seen him before. They were amazed. They recognized him for who he truly was-the Son of God-and responded in worship.5. What impact do you think this event had on Peter?Suggested Response: Peter abandoned himself completely to Jesus, something the other disciples did not do. He risked everything and experienced firsthand the glory of walking on the water. Because of his faithful steps, he succeeded in doing, in God's power, what he could never have done on his own. No doubt he remembered that miracle and the lessons learned for the rest of his life.Let's break into small groups of three to five people for our Small Group Exploration, which begins on page 17. I will give you a one-minute warning before we rejoin for our Group Discussion.Small Group Exploration • 9 minutesParticipant's Guide page 17. Please note there are two topics to explore in this session. Assign one topic to half of the small groups, the other topic to the other half. You may want to have a representative from each group share their discoveries at the beginning of the Group Discussion that follows. Topic AWhere Do We Place Our Trust When We Are Afraid?God knows how fearful we are, and he sometimes uses uncomfortable, real-world challenges to cause us to choose where we will place our trust. John Ortberg explains it this way: "The decision to grow [spiritually] always involves a choice between risk and comfort. This means that to be a follower of Jesus you must renounce comfort as the ultimate value of your life." Let's explore what God says about fear and choosing where we place our trust. 1. What happens when we place our trust in "boats" of our own making instead of placing our trust in God? (See Psalm 49:1-13.)Suggested Response: We all will die one day. We can't take the money we've made with us, nor can it buy eternal life. Trusting in ourselves and our perishable riches or relationships isn't the answer. God alone gives eternal life.2. What did David realize about finding security in God rather than in things? (See Psalm 20:6-7; 118:6-9.)Suggested Response: David realized that God was all the protection he needed and that it was far better to trust in God's saving power than in people, chariots, and horses (symbols of security and power in those days). 3. What do the following verses reveal about God? a. Psalm 18:1-5Suggested Response: God is our strength, our protector, and our deliver. We can find refuge in him. b. Psalm 56:5-4Suggested Response: We can trust in God when we are afraid. c.


Continues.

Excerpt


Chapter One

Acerca de caminar sobre el agua

No es el crítico el que cuenta; no es el hombre que señala cómo el fuerte se derrumba o donde el que hace algo pudo haberlo hecho mejor. El crédito le pertenece al hombre que está en la arena . quien, a lo sumo, conoce al fin el triunfo de un gran logro y, en el peor caso, si fracasa, al menos se atreve osadamente. De modo que su lugar nunca será con aquellas tímidas y frías almas que no conocen ni la victoria ni la derrota.

Theodore Roosevelt

Hace algún tiempo, mi esposa me dio como regalo de cumpleaños un paseo en globo aerostático. Fuimos al aeródromo y nos metimos a una pequeña canastilla junto con otra pareja. Nos presentamos e intercambiamos información sobre nuestras carreras. Entonces el piloto comenzó el ascenso. Apenas había amanecido; era un día claro, fresco y sin nubes. Podíamos ver completo el Valle Canejo, desde los escarpados cañones hasta el Océano Pacífico. Era pintoresco, inspirador y majestuoso.

Pero también experimenté una emoción que no había anticipado. ¿Sabes cuál?

El temor.

Siempre pensé que esas canastillas llegaban más arriba del pecho, pero esta solo alcanzaba nuestras rodillas. Un buen tambaleo habría sido suficiente para echar a alguien por la borda. Así que me agarré con inflexible determinación hasta que los nudillos se me emblanquecieron.

Miré a mi esposa, a quien las alturas realmente la despreocupan, y me relajé un poco, sabiendo que había en la canastilla alguien más tenso que yo. Lo sabía porque no se movía para nada, para nada en lo absoluto. En algún momento de nuestro vuelo pasamos sobre un rancho de crianza de caballos y, sin siquiera voltear o inclinar su cabeza, movió solamente los ojos hacia un lado tanto como pudo y me dijo: «Sí, es hermoso».

Ya para este momento decidí que me gustaría conocer al jovencito que estaba piloteando el globo. Me di cuenta de que podía tratar de autoconvencerme de que todo saldría bien, pero la verdad era que habíamos confiado nuestras vidas y destinos en las manos del piloto. Todo dependía de su carácter y capacidad.

Le pregunté cómo se ganaba la vida y cómo comenzó a pilotear globos aerostáticos. Esperaba que su ocupación anterior estuviera llena de responsabilidades: neurocirujano, quizás o un astronauta que ya no pudo ir al espacio.

Supe que estábamos en problemas cuando comenzó a responderme: «Viejo, es muy fácil .»

¡Ni siquiera tenía empleo! Lo que más hacía era surfear .

Dijo que comenzó a pilotear globos aerostáticos porque un día, luego de tomar varias copas de más, comenzó a pasear en su camioneta, la chocó y como resultado su hermano quedó gravemente herido. Este no se había podido recuperar del todo, así que mirar globos aerostáticos volar lo entretenía un poco.

«Por cierto –añadió-, si llega a caer en picada cuando bajemos, no se sorprendan. Nunca he volado este globo en particular y no estoy muy seguro de cómo va a resultar el descenso».

Mi esposa me miró y me dijo: «¿Quieres decir que estamos a trescientos cincuenta metros sobre el suelo con un surfistadesempleado que comenzó a pilotear globos porque tomó varias copas de más, chocó una camioneta, lastimó a su hermano, nunca ha estado en este globo y no sabe cómo bajarlo?»

En ese momento la mujer de la otra pareja me miró y pronunció las únicas palabras que alguno de ellos iba a decir en todo el vuelo.

«Usted es pastor. Haga algo religioso».

Así que recogí una ofrenda.

La gran pregunta en un momento así es: ¿Puedo confiar en el piloto?

Podría convencerme a mí mismo de que todo resultaría bien. Enfrentar el vuelo con una actitud positiva ciertamente haría el viaje más placentero. Pero este terminaría pronto. La preocupación real era el «tipo» que estaba piloteando el globo. ¿Eran su carácter y capacidad suficientes para dejar confiadamente mi destino en sus manos?

¿O era el momento de hacer algo cristiano?

Todos los días tú y yo recorremos otro tramo de nuestro viaje en este globo gigante que gira en torno a un vasto universo. Solo tenemos una oportunidad de hacerlo. Anhelo enfrentarlo con un gran espíritu de aventura y riesgo. Y apuesto que tú también.

Pero a veces es un paseo muy incierto. Me gustaría que los bordes de mi canasta estuvieran un poco más altos. Que el globo fuera más resistente. Me pregunto cómo terminará mi viajecito. No estoy seguro de la amanera en que voy a maniobrar en mi descenso.

Puedo tratar de convencerme a mí mismo para arriesgarme y creer que todo saldrá bien. Pero la verdadera pregunta es: ¿Hay alguien piloteando esta cosa? ¿Son su carácter y capacidad dignos de confianza? Porque, si no, no quiero arriesgarme. Mi historia, como la de todo ser humano es, al menos en parte, una lucha entre la fe y el temor.

Debido a esto, he sentido atracción durante muchos años por la historia de Pedro cuando sale de la barca y camina sobre el agua con Jesús. Es uno de los mejores retratos del mayor significado del discipulado en la Escritura. En los siguientes capítulos miraremos de cerca cada detalle del relato para encontrar lo que nos enseña acerca de caminar sobre el agua. Pero por el resto de este capítulo, hagamos una toma aérea. ¿De qué está hecho alguien que camina sobre el agua?

Los que caminan sobre el agua reconocen la presencia de Dios

Pedro y sus compañeros se metieron a un pequeño bote una tarde para cruzar el mar de Galilea. Jesús quería estar solo, así que se fueron a navegar sin él. A Pedro no le incomodó eso: había estado en barcas toda la vida. Es más, le gustaban.

(Continues.)

Reviews

Look for similar products by Subject