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Creative Bible Lessons in 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus: 12 Sessions to Deepen Your Faith in a World of Oppression, Danger, and Difficulty

(Paperback - 2004)
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Overview

This newest installment of the bestselling Creative Bible Lessons series provides practical faith-sustaining principles for Christian teenagers from every walk of life. These pastoral epistles, written by the Apostle Paul at the end of his life, give sound instruction on how to lead the young church in a world of oppression, danger, and difficulty. In twelve chapters this book covers leadership, worship, getting in shape, walking the talk, knowing your enemy, money, overcoming opposition, and the Bible."

Details

  • SKU: 9780310255284
  • UPC: 025986255282
  • SKU10: 0310255287
  • Title: Creative Bible Lessons in 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus: 12 Sessions to Deepen Your Faith in a World of Oppression, Danger, and Difficulty
  • Series: Creative Bible Lessons Creative Bible Lessons
  • Qty Remaining Online: 1
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Date Published: Aug 2004
  • Pages: 160
  • Illustrated: Yes
  • Weight lbs: 0.91
  • Dimensions: 10.96" L x 8.50" W x 0.38" H
  • Features: Price on Product, Maps, Illustrated, Bibliography
  • Themes: Theometrics | Evangelical;
  • Category: YOUTH MINISTRY
  • Subject: Biblical Studies - New Testament
NOTE: Related content on this page may not be applicable to all formats of this product.

Chapter Excerpt


Chapter One

1 CORINTHIANS 4:16-17

session 1

paul's pastoral protégés

TALES OF TIMOTHY AND TITUS: FIRST-CENTURY TRUTHS FOR THE 21st CENTURY

During this session students will-

Discover how the lives of Paul, Timothy, and Titus intertwine and affect each other.

Evaluate their own spiritual heritage and plan their spiritual legacy.

* THE BIG IDEA

Both Timothy and Titus were pastors. They were very different from each other, yet God used both of them. God can also use you regardless of your background, gender, financial status, age, or anything else. The truths Paul shared in his letters to these two men will help everyone who reads them.

DID YOU KNOW?

WHAT'S A PASTORAL EPISTLE?

For around 200 years, "Pastoral Epistle" has been used to describe the grouping of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus. These three books of the Bible go together like the flavors in Neapolitan ice cream.

* BACKGROUND CHECK

It is generally agreed that these books were written in this order-1 Timothy, Titus, and then 2 Timothy. The most likely scenario is that Paul was released from prison in Rome (as we last see him in Acts 28). After a few years of freedom, he was recaptured and finally killed in Rome. It's during these last three or four years of his life and ministry that Paul wrote the Pastoral Epistles. If 1 Timothy and Titus were written during the last leg of his race, 2 Timothy was written as he approached the finish line. It is often referred to as his "last will and testament."

Because they are so unlike the other Bible books Paul wrote-the vocabulary is very distinct, plus they were written to a person and not directly to a church (although they were to be used by the Church)-some scholars argue that he must not have written these three books. However, these contrasts simply indicate that these books were written for different purposes. We write a letter to a friend differently than we do a letter to our senator or a letter to the editor of the local paper. So it is with the Pastoral Epistles-they were written for the benefit of the church where Timothy and Titus had been assigned to work, but they were also within God's plan for the entire body of believers that would come and be part of the Church.

OPENING

Option 1: Great Partners

You'll need-

Copies of Great Partners Matching Game (page 13), one for each pair of students

Pen or pencil for each pair

Candy bar prize for the winners

Ask students to pair off and then hand out copies of Great Partners Matching Game (page 13) and a pen or pencil to each twosome. Students should work together to complete the repro page; give them just two or three minutes to do so. Then go over the following answers with the group and award a candy bar prize to the team with the most correct answers: 1-R; 2-Q; 3-K; 4-N; 5-L; 6-T; 7-P; 8-J; 9-S; 10-B; 11-O; 12-A; 13-C; 14-F; 15-U; 16-G; 17-D; 18-M; 19-H; 20-I; 21-E.

Transition with something like this-

This was a fairly easy activity to do because all the partners on the list are not only well-known in their own right, but they are also known for being together. When you think of Paul, you should also think of his various ministry partners: Silas, Barnabas, Timothy, and Titus. Timothy and Titus stand out among even his closest associates because Paul wrote individual letters to each of them, which are included in our Bible. The books of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus are a trilogy and are referred to as the Pastoral Epistles.

Option 2: What Do You Look for in FRIENDS?

You'll need-

Copies of What Do You Look for in FRIENDS? (page 14), one for each student

Pen or pencil for each student

This activity will help your students think about the characteristics they look for-or maybe should look for-in their friends, as well as the kind of friend they should be to others. Pass out the What Do You Look for in FRIENDS? (page 14) and ask students to read the instructions before giving them five to 10 minutes to write down their answers. (Encourage them to write two answers for each letter if they have the time.)

Afterward you can transition with something like this-

When you think of Paul, you should also think of his various ministry partners: Silas, Barnabas, Timothy, and Titus. Timothy and Titus stand out among even his closest associates because Paul wrote individual letters to each of them, which are included in our Bible. The books of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus are a trilogy and are referred to as the Pastoral Epistles.

READ IT IN GOD'S WORD

In order for students to fully appreciate the relationships these men shared with each other, use the "Background Check" section, in addition to the following information, to explain some of the behind-the-scenes facts that intertwine and affect the lives of Paul, Timothy, and Titus.

Jesus and Paul

Jesus sent out 72 of his followers in groups of two to minister to people. Paul continued this tradition by having many people help him in ministry and life: Barnabas, Silas, Luke, Mark, Apollos, Epaphroditus, and Aquila. The women included Priscilla, Lydia, Euodia, and Syntyche-and a lot of other women and men with names that are hard to pronounce.

Jesus had his disciples, but of these 12 men, he had an inner circle of John, Peter, and James. And among these three, John had the closest relationship with Jesus-he calls himself "the disciple Jesus loved." Paul's inner circle would include Barnabas, Silas, Timothy, and Titus. But of them all, Timothy had the closest relationship with Paul.

Timothy and Titus

We know very little about Titus. He was a Gentile believer who ministered and traveled with Paul (Galatians 2:1-3). He served in the troubled church in Corinth (2 Corinthians 8:16-24). Titus is last mentioned as being in Dalmatia (2 Timothy 4:10), or modern-day Yugoslavia, and tradition says he eventually returned to Crete and served there until his death.

We don't know for certain, but it's reasonable to think of Timothy as being between the ages of 15 and 19 when he joined Paul in Acts 16. Therefore, he could have been around 30 or 34 years old when he was doing ministry in Ephesus.

ACTIVITY

INTERNSHIP IMAGINATION: BECOMING PROFESSIONAL IN YOUR PROFESSION

You'll need-

Copies of Internship Imagination (page 15) for each student

Pen or pencil for each student

Hand out the Internship Imagination page (page 15) and something to write with while you read the following instructions-

What do you want to be when you grow up? You've been asked that question throughout your life. Now imagine you get to choose someone-who is now either living or dead-to instruct you as to how to do the professions that are listed on this sheet. Who would you choose to be your instructor in each profession? Write down your answers.

When the activity is completed, ask students to break into smaller groups and explain to each other why they chose the person they did for their dream internship. Or ask a few students to share their responses with the entire group. Then ask, What are the benefits and responsibilities of being mentored by someone great?

The key is to follow someone worth following. Timothy and Titus partnered with Paul in his ministry, and they learned from him how to be a Christian and how to be a minister or a pastor. It was very similar to what we would call an internship today. Now Timothy is going to mentor others by going to Corinth to represent Paul and his ministry.

Ask a student to read this passage for the group-

"I hope in the Lord Jesus to send Timothy to you soon, that I also may be cheered when I receive news about you. I have no one else like him, who takes a genuine interest in your welfare. For everyone looks out for his own interests, not those of Jesus Christ. But you know that Timothy has proved himself, because as a son with his father he has served with me in the work of the gospel" (Philippians 2:19-22).

"I have no one else like him"-Timothy is distinct. He stood out among the other followers of Christ. "The brothers . spoke well of him" (Acts 16:2). Would the adults in your church speak well of you? Would the adults in your church speak well of your youth ministry? Why or why not?

"Who takes a genuine interest in your welfare"-Timothy cares for others. How well do you care for others?

"But you know that Timothy has proved himself"-Timothy had a proven track record. Not just with Paul but with other believers as well. How can you become more reliable?

"Because as a son with his father"-Timothy is like a son to Paul. Paul never had children, but he refers to Timothy and Titus as sons. Do you have a spiritual father or mother who cares for you?

"He has served with me in the work of the gospel"-Timothy is a servant of the gospel. All believers should serve in the work of the gospel in whatever way God has designed them.

Ask a student to read this passage for the group-

"Fourteen years later I went up again to Jerusalem, this time with Barnabas. I took Titus along also. I went in response to a revelation and set before them the gospel that I preach among the Gentiles. But I did this privately to those who seemed to be leaders, for fear that I was running or had run my race in vain. Yet not even Titus, who was with me, was compelled to be circumcised, even though he was a Greek" (Galatians 2:1-3).

Titus was a living illustration of grace! Acts 15:1-19 tells the full story (even though Titus is not mentioned). Timothy came from a mixed heritage, but Titus was not Jewish in any way. Believers of that day tried to combine their traditions of Judaism with their faith in Christ and his grace. It couldn't be done. They wanted non-Jews to be circumcised to prove they were believers. Titus was not circumcised because grace had arrived, and when grace is present, you don't add anything to the recipe of salvation.

ACTIVITY

LIFE TIME LINE CHART

You'll need-

Two-sided copies of Timothy's Time Line and Four Things That Change You (pages 16-17) for each student

Pen or pencil for each student

Blank half sheets of paper for each student

Hand out copies of Timothy's Time Line (page 16) to your students and ask them to take a few minutes to read it individually. As they're looking it over, you may want to highlight a few of the items on the time line. Now ask them to turn their pages over to the side called Four Things That Changed You (page 17). Say something like-

You will pretty much be the same person you are today two, five, 10, even 20 years from now-except for the following four things:

1. Places you go

2. People you know

3. Experiences that cause you to grow

4. Books that cause you to grow

Give students five minutes to write their answers for each item.

Now . using the half pieces of paper you provide for them, your students should use their responses to create a time line for their own lives. The hope is that by working on this project, the students will be able to take a step back and not only see how far God has brought them, but also realize that he isn't done with them yet.

LIVE IT IN YOUR WORLD

Say something like-

Timothy had a rich spiritual history through his mother and grandmother; but being from a Gentile family, Titus did not have this privilege. God used both men, but one benefited from a godly legacy. What kind of legacy will you leave?

Read Jonathan Edward's Legacy (page 18) aloud to your group. Now say-

We talked earlier about WHAT you want to be when you grow up. Now we want to figure out WHO you want to be when you grow up. Use the back of the half sheets of paper-or the internship repro pages we did earlier-and respond to these instructions.

1. Name four places you think would change you if you visited them.

2. List four people with the potential to have a great impact on your life over the next couple of years.

3. Briefly describe four "mountaintop" experiences that you'd like to have.

4. List four ways that "valley" experiences might occur in your future.

5. List four books that you've heard good things about and want to read.

(Note: You could also project these questions onto a screen or blank wall using PowerPoint or an overhead for all the kids to see.)

PUT IT IN YOUR HEART

The brothers . spoke well of [Timothy] (Acts 16:2).

SMALL GROUP QUESTIONS

1. Would your lifestyle remind people of a life in Christ Jesus?

2. Who is your best friend and why?

3. Do you have different best friends depending on where you are-school, work, church, or after-school activities?

4. Do you have an older person who is your primary mentor or encourager for your faith?

5. Who helps you grow in your faith?

6. How do they help you in your faith?

7. Who would you choose to be your mentor about how to be successful? Explain.

8. Who would you choose to be your mentor about how to be spiritual? Explain.

9. Do you need a spiritual mentor?

10. Do you feel more like Timothy (strong Christian family) or Titus (mixed spiritual heritage)?

11. Do you have a spiritual parent in your life? (A spiritual parent is someone who looks after you spiritually the same way your parents look after you otherwise.)

12. What are the benefits of being someone's apprentice?

13. Good training doesn't equal perfection, but it does allow you to be more prepared. What are you doing in your life now to prepare for the future?

CLOSING PRAYER

GREAT PARTNERS MATCHING GAME

On the line to the left of each numbered person below, write down the letter that appears next to the name of each person's buddy, pal, sidekick, or partner in crime from the right-hand column.

1. Moe A. Randy and Paula 2. Batman B. Huck 3. Snoopy C. Ernie 4. Chris Farley D. Kevin Eubanks 5. J.Lo E. Costello 6. Calvin F. Grace 7. Spider-Man G. Jill 8. Mickey H. Tonto 9. Popeye I. Hardy 10. Tom J. Minnie 11. Bonnie K. Charlie Brown 12. Simon L. Too many to count 13. Bert M. Timmy 14. Will N. David Spade 15. Ken O. Clyde 16. Jack P. Mary Jane 17. Jay Leno Q. Robin 18. Lassie R. Larry and Curly 19. The Lone Ranger S. Olive 20. Laurel T. Hobbes 21. Abbott U. Barbie

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN FRIENDS?

Create a personalized acronym for the word FRIENDS. Use words that begin with each capitalized letter to create a list of seven different qualities that you believe are important for any friend to have-including yourself.

Continues.

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